Mending Machines

Mk-1-4 mending machine

The mending machines are a vital part of the robots’ lives. So, it’s no surprise they’ve appeared in a few models now and have gone through numerous changes. In this post, I’ll walk you through the evolution of the mending machines and show you how even Lego® model MOCs go through product life-cycles.

Background

The machine started in Fusion’s first home when asking the question, what would a robot home need for a robot to live in it? More on those answers in the Fusion’s Home post.

One of the necessities would be for a robot to perform maintenance, diagnostics and repair themselves if needed. A communal space such as a hospital or repair shop lacked the personal touch; we all prefer our own bathroom instead of the communal bath houses and toilets in our homes. Thus, Fusion’s first home needed it’s own maintenance bay where Fusion could look after himself. Enter the Mk-I and Mk-II mending machines.

Mk-I and Mk-II

The Mk-I machine was DIY all the way. It came equipped with spare parts that were likely to become damaged (such as Fusion’s arms). You can see 3 spare arms racked on the left below. The bulk of the machine was a diagnostic computer, with the whole kit on a wall-mounted panel. You can see the panel in Fusion’s maintenance bay on the right.

Mk-1 mending machine

Mending Machine in Fusion's house

What if Fusion became too badly damaged to repair himself? The Mk-I wouldn’t be much good in that case. Enter the Mk-II. The Mk-II was a robotic multi-tool system designed to perform any necessary repairs on Fusion directly.

Mk-2 mending machine

Mending Machine in Fusion's house

So begins the new standard-ish form-factor for these machines. This model has an integrated diagnostic computer – far more compact than the original. For effecting repairs the system also has a mag-clamp in the middle surrounded by 2 sets of manipulation arms and laser cutter / welder. The device itself is very compact and far more versatile for different settings than the wall-sized Mk-I.

Mk-III

Here’s the industrial version of the line-up. This one loses the clamps and arm systems, with a diagnostic scanner on the top arm and and chunky laser cutter / welder on the lower arm. The system also has beefy base to house a shielded, heavy-duty power system. In my Robot Repair Shop video below or on my Instagram you can see the system in action, used with the integrated repair bed.

Mk-3 mending machine

Good as new!

Mk-IV

This is the final, domestic model.

Mk-4 mending machine

The Mk-IV has been used in a number of robot households and is most compact, efficient and friendly model. You can see it’s use in a few households below. Each house in Asimov City had one. Fusion’s second house had a miniaturised model in order to fit within the folding spaces. If you haven’t seen it, I recommend watching the deployment video now!

Back on topic, the Mk-IV keeps the same imaging arm and diagnostic computer, but loses the laser for a multi-tool arm with low-power laser aperture on the end. Much friendlier! You can see the power-core on the base return to the Mk-II design, but blue rather than Fusion’s iconic yellow. This version was also designed for the user to be free-standing, so the whole feel is less invasive. In terms of colour, the system is silver / grey and black with neon blue highlights. The idea was to look sleek, futuristic and slightly austere; more like a standardised, functional appliance rather than a fashion piece.

 

 

 

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